Bumblebee Games

A clueless guy trying to make an open-world RPG with no experience.

Yora

Project Hornet

It has now been three months since I started out with my decision to learn making videogames. Since it was clear from the start that little, if any, actual work with Godot would be done during peak season at work and while looking for a new apartment, the game currently existing only as a bunch of scribbled notes is still right on schedule. But moving into my new place is now planned for late June, and I'll be taking my summer break in July. After which I'll be going from a 48-hour work week to a 35-hour week. Very excited about finally taking a crack at learning the most fundamental basics of Godot. And then, eventually, getting to the point where I can start attempting a first prototype for an actual game. Though I have to say, I've already been having a blast for the last three months working on just a general concept for what kind of game I want to create, and how it's roughly going to look and play like. I very seriously considered for a long time making a small, first person, open-world RPG like Morrowind with strong influences from Thief and System Shock 2. But…

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Yora

Where is this Kaendor anyway?

I think by now it's really high time to finally get around to writing up a proper introduction to what this Kaendor thing is all about, other than being some kind of fantasy CRPG. Kaendor is the name of a world, or perhaps more accurately a collection of settings, that I have been developing and using for several campaigns that I have been running for different RPG systems since about 2009. There's never been a fixed world map or persistent geography between the different campaigns, nor a specified history, and over the years whole countries have been dropped from it, and various creatures that inhabit it come and gone. But all of the campaigns had many consistent elements that tied them together, like the many worlds of Final Fantasy games, FromSoft's Soulsborne games, or maybe even the Zelda games. Adapting Kaendor to a videogame format opens up new possibilities to present ideas and concepts that are difficult to bring to life in a pen and paper game, just as there are things that are interesting to play with in your imagination but would be really complicated to put on a screen. As such, the setting for my videogame will once…

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Yora

This is now Bumblebee

Overly ambitious and lacking in impulse control, I already know that I want to use the code and mechanics of my game for at least two different game. A Sword & Sorcery game set in the fantasy world Kaendor, and a Space Opera game taking place in my Iridium Moons setting. Simply calling this site kaendor.com seems unfitting in this context, and so I've been thinking for a while to come up with a label for my game development aspirations in general rather than just the Kaendor setting specifically. And so Bumblebee Games it's going to be.

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Yora

A first draft for RPG mechanics

While I barely have any existing skills with coding or 3D modelling yet, I have do have a lot of experience designing game mechanics for pen and paper roleplaying games. I've been working with and studying new rules system for over 15 years. This is the one area of game design where I feel highly competent, and I can create mechanics with intent, to achieve specific gameplay experiences. With lots of CRPGs that are clearly inspired by pen and paper games, I have a strong impression that the designers tried to simply copy pnp mechanics into a videogame format. At first because that's what they were familiar with from playing such games as a hobby or after work, and then later because that's how most of the existing CRPGs they knew did it. All the Dungeons & Dragons CRPGs explicitly attempt to replicate the D&D game mechanics as faithfully as they can while still being playable. Fallout was originally meant to be a GURPS game until the license was withdrawn during development and they created the SPECIAL system as a replacement. The early Elder Scrolls games used dice roll mechanics. And of course, the entire iso-RPG genre of the last…

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Yora

Do I finally have a game concept?

As anyone who had the patience to follow the progress on my videogame concept to this point should be aware of, I've been plagued by a complete indecision between making it a top-down, party-based RPG or a first-person open-world game from the day that I concluded that a 2D sprite game is definitely off the table. The main argument against a top-down game has always been that the aesthetics of my fantasy and space opera worldbuilding really call for gorgeous landscape views, unreasonably big trees and towers, and views of exotic and alien skies. Which you just don't get when you always hover above the characters and look down at the ground. A first-person game is perfectly suited for such views. But with the ability to push the camera right up to every object in the environment, you have to have much more detail to accomplish the same feeling and appearance of realism, compared to a camera that is 10 meters way. And I also feel that in a non-linear first-person game, where players have freedom to roam around the game world, wilderness environments really only work as open-worlds. If you have smaller areas, players will constantly run into the…

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Yora

The Indecision, what a show! The Indecision, here we go!

It's been only ten days since I announced that I had finally made a decision for which of my two game ideas I want to pursue, and only two days since I wrote a bit more about my priorities for making an open-world immersive-simulation. And yet, here we are again. In the last two days, I cooled significantly about my plans to make an open-world first-person game and instead rediscovered the spark that had me originally excited about making a top-down party-RPG. The biggest factor has probably been my contemplation about representing the scale of the world in-game. While it's not strictly a technical requirement, open-world games basically always have a single continuous overworld map. Skyrim somehow manages to just pull it off to make its world feel like the country it is supposed to represent, but that map is already of a size that would be completely delusional for me to attempt all by myself. Other than that, open-world games usually cover a single island, valley, or city, and have a clear focus on a very local story. But I really like the idea of travelling the world, and also the world feeling world-sized. Isometric RPGs typically had a…

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